Why does StorSimple Matter?

Today is one of those spotlight days when people who don’t know much about StorSimple will want to find out more.

In a nutshell, we have been developing what we believe is the best cloud data management technology that allows our customers to use cloud storage services to manage their enterprise data and storage.

We don’t make the cloud look like a disk drive or tape drive, we make the cloud available as a place to manage data. Our technology segments data that is stored in our systems into small pieces and we track each and every one of those segments wherever it happens to be – whether it is in SSD storage, on hard disks or in the cloud.  As the data is updated, we track all those changes too.

Why?  Because it makes things like recovery from the cloud a whole lot faster than pretending to be a tape drive and it creates a system where data portability between the enterprise data center and the cloud is possible. If you are going to move data between earth and sky, you need to keep track of it somehow and keep up with the changes.  We have a system for doing that.  The various segments of a volume can be anywhere within reach – such as in the cloud – and customers can mount the volume. We assemble all the segments and serve them to applications as they are needed. That’s why disaster recovery is so fast with StorSimple. Customers mount the volume – in the cloud – and have access to everything in it – but only download the data they need to get up and running again.

For those readers who are not into enterprise storage, the technology has similarities to both Data Domain and 3PAR.  All the data in the system is deduplicated like Data Domain systems do, and all the small pieces of the data are presented as live online data the way 3PAR does.  It’s small grained storage virtualization that includes both deduplication and cloud storage.

There is no special hardware required to do this. StorSimple has built systems that have a certain blend of SSDs and hard disks in order to meet certain performance expectations. While there are many exciting opportunities to further leverage our technology in the days ahead, for now we are enjoying the news and looking forward to the excitement of suddenly becoming much more visible and important to a lot of potential customers.

Some gigabytes are worth more than others

Getting clarity on the cost and relative worth of enterprise technology has always been a challenge because of the complex environments and diverse requirements involved. For every good question about which product is better, there is the almost universal answer – “it depends”.  One product might have more capacity than it’s competitors, while another might have a unique feature that supports a new application and another product might have a new operating or management approach that increases productivity.  Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and enterprise customers dig a lot deeper than what appears in competitors’ spec sheets. In some respects, it’s like comparing real estate properties where location and design trump square footage.

One of the traps people fall into when comparing the value of cloud services to legacy infrastructure technologies is limiting their analysis to a direct cost per capacity analysis. This article in Information Week did that in a  painstaking way where the author, Art Wittman, made a commendable effort to make a level cost comparison, but he left out the location and design elements.  He concludes that IaaS services are not worthwhile because the costs per capacity are not following the same cost curve as legacy components and systems.  There is certainly some validity to his approach – if the capacity cost of disk drives has dropped an order of magnitude in four years, why should the cost of Amazon’s S3 service be approximately 39% higher?

Conceding that productivity gains can be realized from cloud services, he limits their value to application services and summarily rejects that they could apply to IaaS. After all the work he had done to make a storage capacity cost comparison, he refused to factor in the benefits of using a service.  Given that omission, Mr. Wittman concludes there is no way for an IaaS business model to succeed.

I agree with Mr. Wittman in one respect, if a service can’t be differentiated from on-site hardware, then it will fail.  But that is not the case with enterprise  cloud storage and it is especially not true with cloud storage that is integrated with local enterprise storage. Here’s why:

Storage is an infrastructure element, but it has specialized applications, such as backup and archiving that require significant expense to manage media (tapes). Moving tapes on and off-site for disaster recovery purposes is time-consuming and error-prone. While the errors are usually not damaging, they can result in lost data or make it impossible to recover versions of files that the business might need. The cost of lost data is one of those things that is very difficult to measure, but it can be very expensive if it involves data needed for legal or compliance purposes.  Using cloud storage as virtual tape media for backup kills two birds with one stone by eliminating physical tapes and the need for off-site tape rotations. It still takes time to complete the backup job and move data to the cloud, but many hours a month in media management can be recaptured as well as tape-related costs.

There are even greater advantages available with backup if it can be integrated from primary storage all the way to the cloud, as it is with StorSimple’s cloud-integrated enterprise storage (CIES).  Using snapshot techniques on CIES storage, the amount of backup data generated is kept to a minimum, which means the amount of storage consumed from the storage cloud service provider is far less than if a customer used the cloud for virtual tape backup storage. Cloud-resident data snapshots have a huge capacity advantage over backup storage where the storage of files for legal and compliance purposes are concerned and it demonstrates how the design of a cloud appliance can deliver even more value from cloud storage.

The next increase in cloud storage value comes from integrating deduplication, or dedupe technology with cloud storage.  Dedupe minimizes the amount of storage capacity consumed by data by eliminating redundant information within the data itself. Sometimes, the amount of deduped data can be quite large – as occurs with virtualized systems. StorSimple’s CIES systems automatically applies dedupe to the data stored in the cloud and squishes capacity consumption to its minimum level – which also minimizes the amount of data that is transferred to and from the cloud. With the help of a cloud-integrated enterprise storage system, the capacity of cloud storage increases in value a lot because so much less of it is consumed.

But the worth of cloud storage is not all about consuming capacity, it’s about accessing data faster than you can from legacy data archives. Data stored in the cloud with a CIES system is online and can be accessed by workers and administrators without the need to find it in a separate archive pool of storage. If you don’t work in IT, you might not know how much time that can save the IT staff, but if you do work in IT, you know this is a huge advantage that returns a lot of administrator time for other projects.

The access to data in cloud storage is probably most valuable when it occurs following a disaster.  Cloud storage provides the ultimate flexibility in recovery by being location-independent.  Backup or snapshot data stored in the cloud can be accessed from almost any location with an Internet connection to the cloud storage service provider.  Again, cloud-integrated storage has some important advantages that further increase the value of cloud storage by requiring only a small subset of the data to be downloaded before application systems can resume production work. This is much faster than downloading multiple virtual tapes and then restoring data to application servers.

I could go on – and I will in future blog posts. This one is long enough already. There are numerous ways that cloud storage is worth more than it’s raw capacity.  Some of this worth comes from its role in disaster recovery but a lot of it comes from how it is used as part of an integrated storage stack that incorporates primary, backup, archive and cloud storage.