Why we reject IT-recommended file sync and sharing tools

water blastingI saw an article in  Information Management Online about research done by London-based Ovum  titled: Widespread Dissatisfaction with File Sync, Sharing Tools

The results of Ovum’s research, conducted with over 5000 corporate employees, indicates that only 9% of them using commercial file sharing technology that is authorized by their IT departments, like it.

This would be pretty damning, if true – but I have no reason to believe otherwise. The article claims over 19 vendors were named in the survey including Box, Citrix, Dropbox, Egnyte, EMC, Google, IBM, Microsoft, Salesforce.com and WatchDox.  Part of the problem, of course, is that file sync technologies are integrated with corporate workflows and there are probably lots of reasons why people dislike those. When the goal of a technology is some form of bureaucratic processing, there just isn’t going to be a big fan base.

When there is discord, there are bad experiences, such as frustration underlying it. One thing I’d hope to find out from this research is what angers everybody so much about these technologies. I suspect a lot of it has to do with the amount of time it takes to find shared files. As the file store gets bigger and more fragmented, the different ways people name and categorize things becomes an obstacle and group cognition slows to a crawl.

While it tends to be most dreadful in large organizations, small ones are not immune. I have experienced the same frustration looking for a file in Google Docs working with a team of 5 as I have using SharePoint at Microsoft with many thousands of people. In other words, I don’t think the tool is the problem. It’s us. We need to find better ways to collaborate at work.

Changing this situation requires overcoming human fallibilities. If we aren’t good at finding files, then our crutch could be better search tools. That’s what the whole business of enterprise search is all about. It’s also what file analytics is about, although the dynamics are different.  Both allow co-workers to find each other’s files, but in the case of file analytics, the search tool is geared to managing files that are identified by the search process.

So even though file sync and share mostly suck, we are stuck using them.  Remedies for that may come from much better searching tools . That or we could just blob out into information entropy.

Congratulations to DataGravity on VMworld Best of Show

ferrari milk

Do you really need a Ferrari to get milk?

The interview below with Paula Long from DataGravity shows why the company is getting so much attention. She really is brilliant and I love a couple of the sound bytes:

“The obvious is sometimes revolutionary”

“Data protection is not just backup, it is understanding who is accessing the information and it is also understanding who should have access to information”

“Do you really need a Ferrari to get milk?”

DataGravity has already started to get people thinking differently about storage and data management. Their announcement last week is the beginning of a whole new vector for our industry and I’m incredibly excited about this new direction of what they call Data Aware Storage systems and File Analytics software.

Quaddracomix: I don’t know

How can you manage all that unstructured data that’s piling up in your storage if you don’t know what it is and what’s in it?

I dont know why I pay you so much

The CEO’s questions are simple enough, What is all this storage used for and why can’t we get rid of the obsolete stuff?

The maddening thing is that smart, experienced IT professionals who have spent their lives working on advanced technology can’t answer these simple questions.  That’s where Quaddra’s Storage Insight file analytics software comes in.

If you need to know what’s in your unstructured data and you don’t want to wait days, weeks or months to find out, you might want to contact us at info@quaddra-sw.com