Archives for May 2012

Google+ Hangout #fail, but I got the peach!

Made a trip to Google HQ today in Mountain View, CA. A quest of sorts – trying to see if we could do a Google+ hangout on-air from the WiFi network on Google’s campus. It sort of worked. The video describes what happened.

If you want to see the video that was created from the hangout, it’s below. Even though it didn’t work today trying to do something goofy from Goole’s campus, I am extremely stoked by Google+ hangouts on air. I only wish they had a shorter name.

The cloud wants your junk data

What do you think about when you think about cloud?   A lot of people think of shiny, new technology made of all new APIs and hypervisors and mobile devices and cutting edge code and things that only the next generation will understand. And for a lot of cloud customers, that’s reality. New, new, new.

What you probably didn’t know, however, is that the storage part of the cloud service provider businesses aren’t hung up on new. In fact, they are ecstatic about old. Old junk data that you would rather forget about, get out of your life and out of your data center. Data that you know you shouldn’t just delete because an attorney somewhere will ask for it. But data that’s taking up expensive tier 1 storage that is the digital equivalent of engine sludge.

Cloud storage services want it – even if you end up deleting it later. It doesn’t matter to them.  You might be thinking they just want to mine your data.  Nope. They are perfectly fine storing encrypted data that they will never be able to read. To them, it’s all the same flavor of money at whatever the going rate is.  They don’t care if the data was a lot bigger before it was deduped or compressed or whatever you have done to it to reduce the cost. Why should they care if you send them 100 GB of data that was originally 1 TB. They don’t.

It’s good business for them – they’ll even replicate it numerous times to prevent data loss.  You might be thinking “but it’s garbage data, I’d never replicate it”.  True, but if it’s garbage, data then why do you have so many backup copies of it on tape and possibly in other locations?  Why are you managing garbage over and over again?

It’s a double win. They want it and you don’t. All you need is the equivalent of a pump to move it from your expensive tier 1 storage to their data storage services. There are a number of ways this can be done, including using products from StorSimple, the company I work for. A StorSimple system ranks data based on usage, compacts it, tags it (in metadata), encrypts it and migrates it to a storage tier in the cloud where it can be downloaded or deleted later if that’s what you decide to do with it. How much money do you think your company is wasting taking care of junk?

Are you feeling lucky, or just confident?

 

 

 

 

Chris Mellor wrote an article for The Register yesterday on cloud storage.  At the end of it all, Chris malappropriated the famous soliloquy from the movie Dirty Harry:

“Being this is a .44 Magnum, the most powerful cloud storage service in the world, and would blow your SAN head clean off, you’ve got to ask yourself one question: ‘Do I feel lucky? “Well do ya, punk?” ®

For those unfamiliar with the movie, the context here is that a violent detective (Dirty Harry) has caught a psychotic serial killer and asks him the ultimate question about his fate.  Tension builds with the realization that Harry is asking himself the same question because he is unsure if there are any bullets left in his gun.  He obviously wants to find out, but struggles with a good cop vs evil cop dichotomy. He needs his psychopathic adversary to make the first move, but he seems awfully confident.

It doesn’t have much to do with cloud storage, other than suggesting the question of fate – something that storage administrators think about with regards to data more often than they think about their own.

So what is the fate of data stored in the cloud and what sorts of steps do cloud service providers take to give customers re-assurances that theirs is safe? You can’t plan for everything, but you can plan to cover an awful lot of mayhem that can occur.

For starters you can store data in multiple locations to protect from being unable to access data from a single cloud site. As Chris’ article pointed out, StorSimple allows customers to do that. They can store data in separate discrete regions run by a single service provider or they can store data in cloud data centers run by different cloud service providers. Different customers will have different comfort levels where cloud redundancy is concerned.

But it’s important to know that cloud storage service providers already store data in multiple locations anyway to protect against an outage at a single site that could cause a data loss. Data in the cloud is typically stored multiple times at the site where it is first uploaded and then stored again at other sites in the cloud service provider’s network.  Customers who are concerned about the fate of their data should discuss how this is done with the storage service providers they are considering because they are all a little different.

There is an awful lot of technology that has gone into cloud storage. We tend to think of it like a giant disk drive in the sky, but that is only the easiest way to think about it.  Cloud storage – especially object storage in the cloud, the kind StorSimple uses and the stuff based on RESTful protocols has been amazingly reliable. There have been other problems with different aspects of the cloud, including block storage, but object storage has been rock solid.  It’s not really about feeling lucky as Dirty (Chris) Harry suggested, it’s about the scalable and resilient architectures that have been built.

We would love to talk to you about cloud storage and how you can start using it. If you have a cloud service provider in mind, we are probably already working with them.